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A Very Brief History of Fatigue Research- Part 4 – 1950’s to Today

This is the final installment of a four-part series on the history of fatigue analysis.  It has been adapted from the upcoming Ph.D. dissertation of VEXTEC’s Robert McDaniels. You can read Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 3 here.

The 1950’s brought another of the seminal events in the history of fatigue.  The world’s first commercial airliner, the DeHavilland Comet, suffered a series of catastrophic crashes in 1953-1954 that resulted in the deaths of all of the crew and passengers Read more

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A Very Brief History of Fatigue Research- Part 3 – The 20th Century through WWII

This is the third of a four-part series on the history of fatigue analysis.  It has been adapted from the upcoming Ph.D. dissertation of VEXTEC’s Robert McDaniels. You can read Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 4 here.

The beginning of the 20th century saw the introduction of metallurgy to the study of fatigue. In 1903, Sir James Alfred Ewing and his colleagues in Scotland were the first to observe and describe slip bands. Read more

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A Very Brief History of Fatigue Research- Part 2 – August Wöhler and the Late 19th Century

This is the second of a four-part series on the history of fatigue analysis.  It has been adapted from the upcoming Ph.D. dissertation of VEXTEC’s Robert McDaniels. You can read Part 1 here, and Part 3 here.

While early and important work was being done by Wilhelm Albert, Jean-Victor Poncelet, William Rankine, and other researchers in the growing field of fatigue in the 1800’s, by far the most influential person at the beginning of the systematic study of fatigue was August Wöhler.  Read more

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A Very Brief History of Fatigue Research- Part 1- The Beginning

This is the first of a four-part series on the history of fatigue analysis.  It has been adapted from the upcoming Ph.D. dissertation of VEXTEC’s Robert McDaniels.  You can read Part 2 here.

Isaac Newton wrote to Robert Hooke “If I have seen further, it is because I have stood on the shoulders of giants.”[1]   Since the first research on metal fatigue began in the 18th century, a very large number of researchers from all over the world have contributed to the knowledge base that has been amassed.  Read more