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Corrosion as the “Good Guy”

Image by Praisaeng at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image by Praisaeng at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

While plenty of industries abhor corrosion and its consequences, another sector has welcomed it as a step in the healing process: medical devices. Devices have evolved over the decades to be less-intrusive during (and after) implantation.The bio-inert nature of titanium (along with its weight and strength characteristics) has made it the go-to material for structural orthopedic implants (hip and knee joints, bone plates and screws, etc.). These implants are made to go into the patient’s body and remain there, hopefully performing well for an extended period of time without the need for replacement. But what about implantable devices that have a finite life of medical functionality, and afterwards can become detrimental to the patient’s quality of life? Read more

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Corrosion as the “Bad Guy”

Corrosion of a can

Image courtesy of sakhorn38 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The topic of corrosion makes recurring appearances in the media; it seems that when you hear about one corrosion-related problem, invariably there will be others reported-on at around the same time. There has recently been a spate of articles confirming that corrosion is currently a headache to the oil and gas sector (undersea bolt failures), as well as to the aviation sector (corrosion-induced fatigue of turbine engine blades in the new Dreamliner aircraft). Oftentimes these stories are first published by financial-leaning news outlets (Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, Bloomberg), a result of the high visibility and cost that these incidents bring in terms of replacement and downtime to their respective industries. Enough of these stories circulating over the span of a few news cycles will make any investor wary, and will prompt questions on what is being done from a regulatory standpoint to restore confidence in companies’ operations. This is particularly true when these reports of corrosion failures have impacts (real, or perceived) on public and environmental safety. Read more

Presentation for the 2015 SIMULIA West Regional User Meeting

Author:  Dr. Sanjeev Kulkarni, Vice President Sales and Business Development.

Dr. Sanjeev KulkarniLast week, I was at the 2015 SIMULIA West Regional User Meeting held at the historic Hayes Mansion in San Jose, CA! VEXTEC was one of the sponsors of the event and is a partner of the Advanced Integration Program. It was the 20th anniversary of this event and I was at the first of these events held in Long Beach. The longstanding tradition of the Regional User Meeting format has continued – providing an invaluable platform for industry and academia to join together and share their knowledge and experience in advancing methods and technology for finite element analysis, multi-physics, process automation, design optimization and simulation management . It was great to catch up with old friends (the Computational Modeling community is a small and close knit community), connect with other users and learn how the latest simulation technology and methods can accelerate and improve product development. At the meeting, I learned about Simulia’s Learning Community portal which is a convenient site to keep abreast of the latest collaborations in the 3DS eco-system.

The main event included future strategies and technology/product updates from Simulia leadership as well as User Presentations and Networking opportunities. I also had the opportunity to participate as an invited speaker. My talk entitled – Computational Modeling of Complex Systems using “Digital Twin” and “Digital Thread” Frameworks – underscored of how VEXTEC’s Virtual Life Management (VLM) technology compliments and aligns with Dassault Systèmes (DS) strategy of computational modeling and uncertainty management. VEXTEC is developing this technology as part of the US Air Force’s initiative on developing a computational Digital Thread, Digital Twin eco-system.

Here is a link to the slides from my presentation: VEXTEC DS SimuliaWest 2015_Presentation