Product Reliability in the Medical Device Industry: Lab Testing Is Not Indicative of True Failure

Brentwood, TN, August 28, 2013:  A recent TV commercial on medical implants caught my attention. While touting the benefits of extensive laboratory testing, the fine print said that “…results of the testing have not been proven to predict clinical wear performance…” How true. Laboratory testing is rarely indicative of true wear and does not predict actual product reliability in the medical device industry. Read more

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VEXTEC to Present at Inaugural Frontiers in Medical Devices Conference

August, 20, 2013-VEXTEC ‘s Chief Technology Officer, Dr. Robert Tryon, and Dr. Animesh Dey, VEXTEC’s Chief Product Development Officer, will be making three presentations at the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) First Annual Conference on Frontiers in Medical Devices: Applications of Computer Modeling and Simulation, in Washington, D.C. September 11-13, 2013. Read more

The Need for Speed

In the race to get products to market, does risk-mitigation get enough time in the winner’s circle?

indy-blog-cover-imageWhat do aerospace, medical device manufacturers, and auto racing all have in common?  Answer: the need to minimize risk of premature/unexpected component failure while crossing the finish line first.  While these industries each have vastly different stakeholders, goals, and success metrics, all look to avoid costly breakdowns in the field.  And speed is key.  Being the first across the finish line in auto racing gives you the largest share of the purse, not to mention first choice of lucrative endorsement deals.  Being the first to market with an innovative or more reliable medical implant or a lighter aircraft component helps in marketing, product launch success, or company profitability and growth.  However, pushing the design limits to gain this speed advantage must be weighed against the possible failure of the component in an unforeseen manner. Read more

Structural Design Concepts: Safe Life, Damage Tolerance and VEXTEC’S Virtual Life Management® (VLM®)

Computer_Structural_Design_OverviewOver the last few weeks, VEXTEC has explored the two main philosophies of modern structural design: safe life design and damage tolerant design.  Today we share with you a summary of these methods, including their benefits and limitations. We will also look at other considerations that are commonly encountered when implementing either method in a manufacturing environment, and how VEXTEC’s Virtual Life Management® (VLM®) technology can help. Read more

Structural Design Concepts: Damage Tolerant Design

The damage tolerance approach to design has been employed by the aerospace industry for decades.  In contrast to the safe life design method, damage tolerance explicitly accounts the fatigue crack growth process.  This design approach takes advantage of Airframe_Structural_Design_Conceptsthe portion of service life a component can have with a growing fatigue crack.  Crack inspection, detection and repair protocols are implemented to prevent fatigue cracks from growing too large and causing failure. Read more

Structural Design Concepts: Safe Life Design

The philosophy of safe life design is the preferred method for designing components for durable operation in the automotive industry.  Under this method, the structure is operated at a stress far below the fatigue strength of the component. By doing this, the designer assumes that the structure will not form a detectable crack during its service life, thus reducing the risk of failure. Read more

Structural Design Concepts: Overview of Safe Life and Damage Tolerance

Note: This post is the first in a series of blogs exploring industry-recognized structural design principles.  This material originated in an internal white paper written by Dr. Robert Tryon, Chief Technology Officer at VEXTEC.

In the world of structural design, there are two main analytical techniques that are currently employed when attempting to predict the durability of components and systems: safe life design and damage tolerance analysis. Depending on the type of industry, one particular philosophy can be preferred over the other.  We offer here an overview of these design philosophies. Read more

SEQUESTERING THE NEXT GENERATION

The hottest word currently being spoken in offices and around dinner tables in the US is “sequestration.” Not since the seminal juror movie 12 Angry Men has the word enjoyed such buzz.  While there are many ongoing debates concerning the political ramifications of this government budget-reduction action (that went into effect on March 1), today we would like to discuss one item in particular: its possible effect on military aviation. Read more

2012 TRENDS: DESIGN OF TURBINES FOR COST, AVAILABILITY AND RELIABILITY

Posted by: WindPowerEngineering.com

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With larger, more powerful turbines coming online, requirements for pitch control are increasing. Experts say the wind-power industry is also beginning to adopt aerospace test technology, the same kind used to vet airplane designs, to simulate loads on wind turbine blades before installation. Read more