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Air Force Awards VEXTEC® SBIR PH II to Develop Corrosion Prediction Software for the Lifetime Assessment of Airborne Systems

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

USAF SealOctober 5, 2016 -The United States Air Force (USAF) recognizes that rising procurement cost and shrinking budgets require sustainment of existing aircraft. An improved life cycle management tool that helps inform sustainment decisions and extends remaining useful life of aircraft is essential for decreasing total ownership costs. To facilitate this effort, the USAF has awarded a new Phase II Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to VEXTEC to develop a software that can be used to predict the effect of corrosion on the lifetime assessment of airborne systems. Read more

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The Comet’s Resonance

https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.enA couple of months ago, there was an anniversary that might not be very well-known: July 27, 1949. It is a date as momentous for air travel as it is for the advancement of the field of fatigue and fracture mechanics. On this date,
the de Havilland Comet, the world’s first jet airliner designed and built for commercial passengers, underwent its first test flight in Hertfordshire, England. The prototype performed admirably, and paved the way for the Comet’s entry into service by the British Overseas Airways Corporation in 1952. The designs of the Comet 1 and 1A aircraft were revolutionary, with two de Havilland Ghost turbojet engines built into each wing, a pressurized cabin for the comfort of 44 passengers, and large square windows yielding a generous visual perspective that was rarely seen by civilians before that time. Read more

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Corrosion as the “Good Guy”

Image by Praisaeng at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image by Praisaeng at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

While plenty of industries abhor corrosion and its consequences, another sector has welcomed it as a step in the healing process: medical devices. Devices have evolved over the decades to be less-intrusive during (and after) implantation.The bio-inert nature of titanium (along with its weight and strength characteristics) has made it the go-to material for structural orthopedic implants (hip and knee joints, bone plates and screws, etc.). These implants are made to go into the patient’s body and remain there, hopefully performing well for an extended period of time without the need for replacement. But what about implantable devices that have a finite life of medical functionality, and afterwards can become detrimental to the patient’s quality of life? Read more

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Corrosion as the “Bad Guy”

Corrosion of a can

Image courtesy of sakhorn38 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The topic of corrosion makes recurring appearances in the media; it seems that when you hear about one corrosion-related problem, invariably there will be others reported-on at around the same time. There has recently been a spate of articles confirming that corrosion is currently a headache to the oil and gas sector (undersea bolt failures), as well as to the aviation sector (corrosion-induced fatigue of turbine engine blades in the new Dreamliner aircraft). Oftentimes these stories are first published by financial-leaning news outlets (Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, Bloomberg), a result of the high visibility and cost that these incidents bring in terms of replacement and downtime to their respective industries. Enough of these stories circulating over the span of a few news cycles will make any investor wary, and will prompt questions on what is being done from a regulatory standpoint to restore confidence in companies’ operations. This is particularly true when these reports of corrosion failures have impacts (real, or perceived) on public and environmental safety. Read more

The Manufacturing Maintenance Balancing Act

In a 2006 Nielsen study1, auto industry manufacturing executives reported that stopped production costs averaged $22,000 per minute or $1.3 million per hour of downtime. When surveyed, 53% of the manufacturers agreed that predictive and preventative maintenance was the key to reducing this loss of productivity and revenue. So, what is the best practice for determining how to maintain and operate your manufacturing line to optimize productivity and maximize revenue? Read more