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The Comet’s Resonance

https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.enA couple of months ago, there was an anniversary that might not be very well-known: July 27, 1949. It is a date as momentous for air travel as it is for the advancement of the field of fatigue and fracture mechanics. On this date,
the de Havilland Comet, the world’s first jet airliner designed and built for commercial passengers, underwent its first test flight in Hertfordshire, England. The prototype performed admirably, and paved the way for the Comet’s entry into service by the British Overseas Airways Corporation in 1952. The designs of the Comet 1 and 1A aircraft were revolutionary, with two de Havilland Ghost turbojet engines built into each wing, a pressurized cabin for the comfort of 44 passengers, and large square windows yielding a generous visual perspective that was rarely seen by civilians before that time. Read more

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Corrosion as the “Bad Guy”

Corrosion of a can

Image courtesy of sakhorn38 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The topic of corrosion makes recurring appearances in the media; it seems that when you hear about one corrosion-related problem, invariably there will be others reported-on at around the same time. There has recently been a spate of articles confirming that corrosion is currently a headache to the oil and gas sector (undersea bolt failures), as well as to the aviation sector (corrosion-induced fatigue of turbine engine blades in the new Dreamliner aircraft). Oftentimes these stories are first published by financial-leaning news outlets (Wall Street Journal, CNN Money, Bloomberg), a result of the high visibility and cost that these incidents bring in terms of replacement and downtime to their respective industries. Enough of these stories circulating over the span of a few news cycles will make any investor wary, and will prompt questions on what is being done from a regulatory standpoint to restore confidence in companies’ operations. This is particularly true when these reports of corrosion failures have impacts (real, or perceived) on public and environmental safety. Read more

The Need for Speed

In the race to get products to market, does risk-mitigation get enough time in the winner’s circle?

What do aerospace, medical device manufacturers, and auto racing all have in common?  Answer: the need to minimize risk of premature/unexpected component failure while crossing the finish line first.  While these industries each have vastly different stakeholders, goals, and success metrics, all look to avoid costly breakdowns in the field.  And speed is key.  Being the first across the finish line in auto racing gives you the largest share of the purse, not to mention first choice of lucrative endorsement deals.  Being the first to market with an innovative or more reliable medical implant or a lighter aircraft component helps in marketing, product launch success, or company profitability and growth.  However, pushing the design limits to gain this speed advantage must be weighed against the possible failure of the component in an unforeseen manner. Read more

SEQUESTERING THE NEXT GENERATION

The hottest word currently being spoken in offices and around dinner tables in the US is “sequestration.” Not since the seminal juror movie 12 Angry Men has the word enjoyed such buzz.  While there are many ongoing debates concerning the political ramifications of this government budget-reduction action (that went into effect on March 1), today we would like to discuss one item in particular: its possible effect on military aviation. Read more